Get Clients Not Jobs

It’s pretty nice when the phone rings, you give a quote, and you get the job. What’s even nicer is when that job turns into another job, and then another. That’s what happens when you get a client, not a job. When the phone rings, everyone is going to try to land the job, as they should. Not only is it money in your pocket, it’s an opportunity to show a new potential client what your capable of. They may have more work, or it might just be a one and done. Either way, it’s an opportunity that knocked on your door, and all you had to do was answer. But what about when you go out looking for work? When it comes to marketing, and choosing who you are going to target, you may want to think about getting clients, not jobs. You get paid to fly, but not to market your services. So it makes sense to get clients that will use you for many jobs, not just one. You also want to make the most out of your marketing time and money by targeting a potential client, not a potential job. When looking for clients, consider how much work they will provide on a weekly, monthly, or yearly basis. The client, firm, or business that can provide multiple jobs per week can fill a lot of flight time. If it seems like it would take significantly more effort to get a client like that, consider this.

You work directly for a home owner to provide a roof inspection following a big storm.

You charge them $150 for the job and no further work is needed until the next big storm hits.

Total for the job

Yearly total for client

Clients Needed To Bill $50,000

You work directly for a home owner to provide a roof inspection twice a year.

You charge them $150 for each visit.

Total for the job

Yearly total for client

Clients Needed To Bill $50,000

You work directly for many home owners to provide roof inspections following a big storm.

You book 5 jobs per day for a week. You charge $150 per job but the work is over in a week.

Total for the job

Yearly total for client

Storms Needed To Bill $50,000

You work for a roofing contractor that provides 2 roof inspections per week.

Because of the volume of work, you cut them a better deal on pricing and only charge them $100 for each inspection.

Total for the job

Yearly total for client

Clients Needed To Bill $50,000

Chances are pretty good that your business will consist of a variety of jobs, clients, and contracts. The example given here is intended to focus your marketing efforts when looking for new work. It takes a lot of time, effort, and resources to land hundreds of clients. Getting a handful of clients that provide a lot of work is a little more reasonable for most drone pilots. Marketing is a necessity, but the less of it you have to do, the better. Too many people are thinking short term instead of long term. Getting “one and done” jobs is great, but it’s short term money. Success is about long term, so think about your approach when considering your next big marketing campaign.